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reagan is still off the shore of japan launching aircraft loaded with supplies. but the shift moved further on tuesday after some crewmembers tested positive for low levels of radiation. -- further out to sea after some crewmembers tested for low levels of radiation european pet energy officials are applying stress tests to their plant and germany officials have switched off some of their plants, one of them permanently. >> the nuclear crisis in japan comes just as america had finally started to get past its discomfort with nuclear power, caused more than 30 years ago by three mile island. >> it is called the nuclear present -- renaissance, the growing acceptance in recent years of nuclear energy as a clean, green, and an effective answer to the country's dependence on foreign oil. then came the disaster in japan, still unfolding. >> one fears if one is an advocate of nuclear energy that for now, the nuclear renaissance is over in america. >> for all of its outside, the crisis in japan exposes the downside once again. america is entering the 32nd anniversary of three mile island, ma
develop -pblts and brand-new stories this hour. the scale of japan's disaster one of the worst in history. another strong earthquake shakes tokyo. a tsunami clams one coastal city, the damage $40 million. forces loyal to moammar gadhafi reportedly making big gains. word they captured an opposition stronghold west of the capitol. what is next, a question we are going to ask. it's all new and live and it's "happening now." greg: a lot of news to get to on this tuesday. good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: good morning, i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now a new aftershock rocking gentleman man as the nation koeps with a nuclear disaster in the making after a third exemploys at one of your plants causing radiation to league out at dangerous levels. the water meant to cool off the fuel rods now reportedly boiling, a very tphopl must sign, jon, some way. greg: that's right. at least two dozen people nearby getting the contamination treatment while another 140,000 people in the danger season have been ordered to seal themselves indoors. jenna: just imagine wh
>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sides in the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three.
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
bringing to six the total number of reactors that have failed in japan. here's what we know at this hour. those six reactors are at risk of spreading radiation about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. one building exploded early this morning, housing one of those reactors, but remarkably we're told the reactor containment vessel is still intact and crews are pumping sea water into that vessel to try to cool it right now. so far there are no further reports of radiation escaping from that site. japanese officials confirmed the deaths of almost 700 people, but tens of thousands of people are still missing tonight. more than 215,000 people are living in temporary shelters in five areas. and millions are without water and power at this hour. here in california, we, too, have nuclear power plants and earthquakes. could it happen here. there are 104 power plants in the u.s. including two on the west coast. the closest reactor to the bay area is the diablo canyon nuclear power plant located near san luis obispo. it's said it's unlikely what happened in japan would happen here. >> as you
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
>> also this morning, an explosion releasing dangerous levels of radiation in japan. >> new report being released accuses top officials of the huge public employee pension fund of corruption. they illegally spent $180 million of the pension's money. a little rain and more on the way. we'll tell you about that coming up. >> let's talk about that. i'm kristen sze. hello. it could be a little damp coming and going today. >> yeah, both ways. >> absolutely. we've got moist flow right now. mild temperatures when you step outside. that is leading to showers, live doppler, best around marin county. everybody covered in at least radar returns this morning. so the north bay getting the lighter rain. we're talking about couple hundredths of an inch but enough to make everything wet. we do have radar returns around san ramon, danville, heading to palo alto over towards milpitas. big picture will show all this is coming ashore and more up to the north with a cold front that will be pushed our way. this is just the beginning. here is frances. >> we are starting off with a live shot in the north
, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in these attacks he launched from south america to stop gadhafi from firing on his own people. we
rundown." we will see you tomorrow. >>> and the nuclear crisis in japan worsens following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. high levels of radiation force 140,000 people indoors. could it happen here with a powerful earthquake off the west coast said to be overdue? we will talk to the head of california's emergency management agency. >>> and then there's libya. gadhafi's forces take the last rebel-held town west of tripoli, increasing pressure on the west to intervene. monday, secretary clinton met with opposition leaders. clinton is saturday seth to land in cairo he this hour. andrea mitchell traveling with her it is tuesday, march 15th, the ides of march. savannah is on assignment. the japan crisis weighs on the world market that at the opening bell. and saudi forces have entered bahrain there is a budget vote on capitol hill there is a fight on the right over sarah palin and general david petraeus testifies on afghanistan. that's all happening today. let's get to the run down but begin with japan and the nuclear crisis there a third explosion in four days at th
and thousands more may still be buried and japan's economy is reeling. overnight the nikkei index has lost 10% of its value. since this time yesterday. explosions, fires, a possible meltdown in several of the reactors. even nuclear experts say this crisis is rapidly descending into unchartered territory. we are joined by stan grant in tokyo. what is going on now, stan? what exactly is the japanese government saying? >> reporter: carol, this takes twists and turns almost by the hour, let alone by the day. let me focus in on two things that occurred today. an explosion in the number two reactor. there are concerns this may have caused some damage to the containment vessel and that is important in the case of a full meltdown because that is the last line of defense in keeping in the nastier radiation inside the plant and not seeping into the atmosphere. a fire then in reactor number four. what appears to have happened in this disabled reactor so much heat generated that a pool of water in which there was spent fuel rods evaporated. the fuel rods according to an trs company here may have ignited
>>> fears of another disaster in japan as the struggle continues to control damaged nuclear power plants. >>> authorities catch a suspect using a seldom-used kind of d ney comparison. we'll have details coming up. >>> five people wound in an overnight incident in san francisco. why it could be gang-related. the noon news begins now. >> good afternoon. >>> topping our news in japan, the threat of nuclear contamination from a damaged power plant is growing more critical and is causing complications for people struck in the aftermath of the massive earthquake and tsunami. david piper begins our coverage. >> reporter: survivors of the deadly earthquake and tsunami have something else to worry about, fears of failing nuclear reaction yarr for the in japan. men, women, and others around the area undergoing contamination checks. >> that's how it is, i think. if they test me, i will be relieved. >> reporter: officials ordered 140,000 people to seal themselves indoors because of soaring radiation levels after an explosion and fire at the fukushima plant on tuesday. the government said
you next fox news sunday. >> a fox urgent tsunami warning issued for japan. after a 6.5 magnitude earthquake has hit off shore. this coming from the japan meteorology agency, the tsunami could be 1.6 feet and as we know, the size is deceiving when it comes in and how the wave comes in and how much it can take when it goes back out. dominique dei-natale with the latest on this. >> reporter: harris, it happened just 30 minutes ago. the details we have at the off the coast, which is supposed to be fukushima nuclear plant having the problems from the results of the tsunami and earthquake. and taking the height, 1.6 as well, but it's not about the height of the wave it's actually the back distance of the wave, how high it is, and goes back, and the force that it will bring it it hits shore. we haven't had confirmation whether the tsunami has happened, but probably in at that area, as result of the march tsunami. the wave touched in and big enough (inaudible) it will just drag even more around and the recovery process going on up there, particularly difficult. and where the united stat
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidence actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. so as their unfolding very rapidly on an hour by hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports. we don't really know in detail what's happening. >> we're at a moment in time where, obviously, all of us are heartbroken by the images of what the happening in japan. we're reminded of how american leadership is critical to our closest allies even if those allies are economically advanced and powerful, there are moments when we need our help and we're bound together by a common humanity. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." a live look at times square. it is thursday, march 17th, st. patrick's day, with us on set, pulitzer prize-winning historian, jon meacham, the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch and columnist for "the new york times," nicholas kristof. also in washington, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. a lot going on today. japan looking graver and graver by the moment. >> certainly is. it seems, there's been
>> chris: i'm chri chris walla. the latest on the battle in libya and the nuclear crisis in japan. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of en
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
the devastation in japan but the nuclear crisis which gets more and more dire by the hour. toyota losing $73 million a day as a result of their plant closings and they're not the only ones sufficie s suffering . no market hit harder than japan's itself. the nikkei plummeting 16% over the past two days and as barry will point out, more than 20% from its levels prior to this crisis. all of those numbers, the worst they've seen in that country, since 1987 wall street had all sorts of common tear today including those who believe there is further room for weak innocence our markets that have run up over the past couple of years driven by frederal reserv money printing. what happen do investors are the rest of us ultimately anticipate will be effect of all of this? that is the question. joining us, ceo and exquity director. barry it looked like any asset that existed became worse less. oil, gold, everybody become worth less, why? >> the fear trade, the risk-on trade, people have a tendency to panic when they don't know what's going on. you don't know how to discount the impact of a possible nucle
. hi, everybody. i'm thomas roberts. the watching and waiting continues in japan where the devastation continues, and the big question remains how dangerous is the radiation leaking from that country's nuclear plants in we're going to cover things from all angles. officials in japan say there's no plans to expand the evacuation around the crippled fukushima daiichi plant. there's now a crew of 300 people working in shifts trying desperately to contain the radiation. robert bazzell is nbc news chief science and environment correspondent, he joins us now. >> well, thomas, it's bad, because it's out of control. there has not been a major radiation leak yet outside of the workers inside -- the government today set only one of the workers had receive what could be considered a medically significant amount of radiation. so there has yet to be any significant rad yags leak, according to the officials. the problem is at least 4 of the 6 reactors are out of control in some way or another, and they could explode or melt or release large amounts of radiation into the environment, and that's the b
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
, japan's prime minister is calling it the worst crisis since world war two as rescue workers search for survivors from the earthquake and tsunami that hit japan. officials what red cross to the magnitude of the damage is not known, 2000 people >> reporter: justice said japan and other very dark, cold night. there follows what was an extremely difficult day for survivors, rescuers and the country as a whole. but days after the largest earthquake on record life is anything but normal. some headed back to work but were left stranded due to pirated, and downed trees. news from the disaster continues to be grim. reports of 2000 bodies discovered off the coast. >> 65 years after the end of war were to this is the tempest, most difficult crisis for japan. >> reporter: the destruction is a one- dimensional. insensate 80 mi. from the epicenter loads of homes of latin, reduce stress. lives, strewn about. on the ground, from the air surest and rescue teams look for survivors they find few miracles. washed away by the tsunami this woman house of to retreat, a floor mat for hours until hall ar
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
are hammering financial markets, with stocks plunging worldwide, japan with its worst two-day slump in two decades, down 11%. death toll has officially reached 3,300. while thousands more remain missing. but today, a small sign of hope. a man found alive, pulled from the rubble, four days after the earthquake struck. a small miracle, but a miracle, nonetheless. nbc's kristin dahlgren is closely following developments in the area and joins us live from tokyo. good evening, kristin. >> reporter: good evening, martin. the latest we're hearing from this washington, d.c.-based nuclear research group is that they expect this disasterer to reach a seven on their scale of nuclear radioactive disasters, the only other accident to reach that level is chernobyl. so that gives you some idea of what some experts think we could possibly be looking at here. of course, nobody at this point knows. we're told even here in tokyo there's some elevated levels of radioactivity, about ten times what is normal and officials don't believe that poses any health risk, but others say they're not sure of what the long
that people are picking up now who have been traveling around in japan, at least they were working at the nuclear facility, are minuscule. there is a lot of radiation at the site, but there's not a lot of radiation in the environment. there's very sensitive instruments to measure it, but it does not mean that the level is a health threat. now, the big concern right now is that here in tokyo, because this is now downwind, the winds have shifted. usually, they have been pushing the radiation out to sea. now the winds are aiming at tokyo. and 30 million people live in the greater tokyo area. and so if there were to be a massive release now, it's a big deal. so there's a lot of fear about that issue around here. >> and so, bob, given what the japanese government has said so far, i mean, they're telling people within a 19-mile radius to stay inside. our government is telling americans 50 miles away, no, get out. do the japanese people trust their government is going to protect them? >> reporter: well, some do and some don't, of course. and there's a lot of people who have already left t
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
their estimate of the cost to japan, to claim that the wealth loss was almost $1 trillion. that is clearly not realistic at all. the drop has been too much. one reason is that the market has been then. there is not that much confidence in it. in europe, there has also been a drop in the stock market, but the same story. the u.s. stock market has been pretty resilient. nothing -- nothing much has really happened. maybe it is unfortunate, but japan is simply not a big market for the united states. we do not export much to anybody anymore. in particular we do not export a lot to japan. we worry about japan, it is too soon about a big interruption to our electronic and automobiles supplies. i do not expect that to happen. i do not think that what goes on in japan will have a big effect on the u.s. economy. >> yes, sir. >> there's not much talk about the radioactive effect on human beings. the radio act cavity in the air and in the mark -- and in the ocean, should we monitor it -- the radioactivity in the air and in the ocean, should we monitor it? and also, over the years, there is a province
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
. with you when it's time to save. ♪ fears of a nuclear meltdown in japan tonight after an explosion at a reactor. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated. >>> the nuclear situation in japan is raising concerns here in california about the safety of two power plants. we'll have details on that coming up. >>> santa cruz is trying to recover from yesterday's tsunami. dozens of people who live on the water are homeless tonight. >>> plus, a look at the damage on the big island of hawaii. several popular resorts are shut down tonight. the news at 5:00 starts right now. >>> good evening. i'm diane dwyer. tonight the biggest concern in japan is potential fallout from a nuclear explosion today. two reactors are damaged and 140,000 people are being evacuated following an explosion and fire at one reactor earlier today. all residents there are now undergoing radiation testing. and tonight at least nine people have been exposed to radiation. also tonight, tens of thousands of people are still missing. and whole towns were wiped off the map. right now, officials say 1,400 people are conf
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: workers at japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop g
containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
's largest private employ ear. >>> we have felt the earth move but with what's happening in japan should be be looking into buying quake insurance? our don't waste your money plan figures it out for you. >> and starting tomorrow and continuing through july taxi cabs will charge an extra dollar fuel sur charge for riders with in the district. >> you can play on the man made court in the festival or follow the rolling meat ball, the millersville. . >>> as we keep watching japan the nuclear regulation commission said we don't expect to see radiation at farmful levels reaching baltimore. the epa has interesting websites set up and it monitoring the food and water. we have an air monitor system here, there is one in dc and one up in dover delaware and the monitors that were checked today detected levels far below any levels for concern. i want to chase everybody to the website, it's interesting, it's epa.governor/japan 2011. we have it waiting for you on the website. >> you know a power company in charge of japan's nuclear reactor said they made a mistake when they measured radiation level
>> darya: 70 a.m. the new crises at the power play and japan continues. >> mark: the police are looking for the shooter's after five people are shot overnight. >> darya: the kron 4 morning news at 7:00 a.m. start to melt. >> life from the bay area new station this is the kron 4 morning news. >> mark: good morning tuesday march 15, 2011. >> louisa: right now scattered showers we saw on and push through now pushing off to the east. where'swe are seeing scatd showers but for the most part we are seeing a light rain, pitcher scattered showers to the north bay as well. current temperatures right now in to the '50s. as we move through the day today, by the time the store moves through we could get one- quarter of an inch-three- quarters of the bench. that's where we will pick up the most break today. by wednesday, thursday weaker systems will move through. friday breezes store meant, notice how widespread we all are also going to see heavier downpours. by the afternoon staying cooler into the upper 50s as '60s. south bay could work its way up and to the mid-60s today. here's your
that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 reactors currently account for 20% of the electricity that we use and with the future of nuclear energy will be as part
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